aboutLifeLong

  1. Positive adoption language is a carefully selected use of words that demonstrates the importance of adoption. Using positive adoption language, we can fight the negative stigma sometimes lingering in society about adoption. Positive language was first established in 1979 by a Minneapolis social worker named Marietta Spencer. The purpose of positive adoption language is to embrace adoption, build self-esteem, and honor everyone involved in the adoption process.

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  2. There are many benefits that come with keeping in contact with a child’s birth father. It helps to establish a sense of connection for the child and allows them to develop a deeper understanding of their identity. Open communication also gives the child and parents access to important genetic and medical information that they might not have access to in a closed adoption. Additionally, communicating with the birth father is way of preserving the child’s connection to family, culture, and ethnic heritage.

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  3. Documentaries are a great way to learn more about the lives of others while seeing the possibilities that may lay ahead in our own journeys. If you want to learn more about adoption, these documentaries are a great way to see what happened in a few specific cases.

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  4. Adoption is an exciting, yet stressful process. So many adoptive parents can easily start feeling overwhelmed with questions. It’s difficult to know where to start.

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  5. In an open adoption, as the name suggests, everyone’s identities are known, and all parties are open to communication, but that process raises a lot of questions. We answer a few of the most common questions below.

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