You've probably heard the saying that no one is ever one hundred percent truly ready to have a child, and to some extent, that rings true. You can never really know what changes a child will bring to your life until those changes are happening. However, there are some things to consider when you are trying to decide whether or not you are ready to adopt.


Infertility Considerations

One reason that many people choose to pursue adoption is because they have not been able to have biological children of their own. If this is the case for you, it is highly recommended to take a step back and consider where you're at mentally and emotionally with your struggle with infertility. If you have not pursued medical treatments for infertility, you may want to discuss that option with your partner before moving on to adoption.

If your struggle with infertility has been a long or emotional one, you might consider seeking out counseling to help ensure you, and your partner if applicable, are ready to adopt.


Reasons for Adopting

Another thing you should examine in yourself before deciding to adopt is why you want to adopt. Adoption shouldn't be seen as an act of charity or goodwill. It shouldn't be done because you cannot have biological children and you feel like being a parent is just 'what is done'. These motivations, while well-meaning, can lead to resentment when it comes to how your life has changed. The best reason to adopt, and really the only reason one should adopt, is out of a deep-seated desire to be a parent.


Financial Readiness

Unfortunately, adoption is notoriously expensive. In addition to that, raising a child is far from cheap, though of course both of these things can be done to some degree on a budget. Because of this, it is important to assess your financial situation before diving into adoption. If you are not financially ready to adopt, you might consider fundraising or applying for adoption grants.


Support Structure

As you move closer to getting ready to adopt a child, it is important to consider the support structure you have around you. Having family and friends offer their support can make raising a child a lot easier. Of course, this additional support is not essential, but if you do not live near family or friends who are willing to extend a helping hand from time to time, it doesn't hurt to have a plan for how to deal with that lack. Consider reaching out to friends and family ahead of time to let them know what you're considering so you can find out who will be willing to support and help your growing family.